Weekly Feature



2016-04-14 / Editorial

Out of the Past


PROUD PARADE — On Sunday, April 29, 1979, Depew kicked off its Diamond Jubilee celebration with an Easter Parade. Here, residents are shown on Terrace Boulevard heading toward Veterans Park. The day concluded with a Gala Jubilee Ball at Hearthstone Manor. 
Photo from “Images of America: Depew” and courtesy of Theresa Wolfe and Arthur Domino PROUD PARADE — On Sunday, April 29, 1979, Depew kicked off its Diamond Jubilee celebration with an Easter Parade. Here, residents are shown on Terrace Boulevard heading toward Veterans Park. The day concluded with a Gala Jubilee Ball at Hearthstone Manor. Photo from “Images of America: Depew” and courtesy of Theresa Wolfe and Arthur Domino 125 Years Ago

April 16, 1891

• “Late hours,” said Mr. Pendleton, “are very, very wrong. I shall not permit Mrs. Pendleton to do this sort of thing often.” It was Mr. Pendleton’s fault that he was sitting up for his wife, for she had urged him again and again to go with her, but as he would not, and the occasion was a cousin’s wedding party, she had gone alone.

• Deputy Sheriff Asa B. Smith arrested Leroy Fowler of Elma, yesterday, on the serious charge of arson. He was brought to Buffalo and lodged in jail. Fowler is charged with setting fire to the house and barn of his brother. He was taken before a country justice who held him for the grand jury on the charge of arson in the first degree. The burning of the property was a problem too deep for Elma, and word was sent to Buffalo asking that a detective be sent there to unravel the mystery. Fowler was suspected, as he had desired to buy his brother’s property, and the latter refused to sell unless he received the money for it. Suspicion was entertained that Fowler applied the torch out of revenge. Deputy Sheriff Smith worked at the case until he thought he had secured enough evidence to justify an arrest.

• As most of the readers of the TIMES are aware, there has been in existence in our village for several years past a small and unpretentious library under the management of a committee from the Presbyterian Church. While this has in a quiet way done much to supply wholesome and instructive literature to quite a large number, it has for some time past been apparent to three or four of our prominent citizens that the scope of the library would be enlarged and its usefulness greatly augmented, if it were made a public institution having no particular connection with any church or society.

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