Weekly Feature



2016-04-14 / Front Page

Clinton highlights Senate tenure, presidential agenda at rally

New York State Primary: April 19
by KAITLIN LINDAHL East Aurora Editor


Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks Friday to an overflow crowd at the Buffalo Transportation Pierce-Arrow Museum on Seneca Street. She cited her governmental experience as the prime reason why she should be the party’s nominee. 
Photo by David F. ShermanPurchase color photos at www.BeeNews.com Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks Friday to an overflow crowd at the Buffalo Transportation Pierce-Arrow Museum on Seneca Street. She cited her governmental experience as the prime reason why she should be the party’s nominee. Photo by David F. ShermanPurchase color photos at www.BeeNews.com Inside a packed Pierce-Arrow Museum in Buffalo on Friday afternoon, presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton took to the podium to increase support before New York’s April 19 primary.

To kick off the afternoon and make her claim that she is the best choice for the Democratic nomination, Clinton reflected on her resume, chiefly her achievements as a U.S. senator from New York and the impact she had on Western New York.

“Ever since I first came to Buffalo when I was running for the Senate, I have just felt a connection to this city and to Western New York, and it has been one of the great honors of my life to see the work we’ve done, the transformation that has taken place,” Clinton said. “I was at the [Buffalo Niagara] Medical Campus today seeing some amazing things, and the investment we made in research and development is already creating jobs and businesses.”


Facing competition in the April 19 primary, Hillary Clinton tells supporters she has a record of helping Western New York. 
Photo by David F. ShermanPurchase color photos at www.BeeNews.com Facing competition in the April 19 primary, Hillary Clinton tells supporters she has a record of helping Western New York. Photo by David F. ShermanPurchase color photos at www.BeeNews.com Clinton also brought up her roles in keeping the Niagara Falls Air Reserve Station open, helping retired workers from the Bethlehem Steel Corp. secure health care and aiding the transformation of the Buffalo waterfront.

“I took the lessons that I learned, and I am applying them to what I want to do as your president,” she said of her time in Senate.

During her approximately hour-long speech, Clinton transitioned from her work as senator to what her agenda would look like as president should she be elected in November.

First, Clinton emphasized getting more federal funding of research and continuing to build on medical and scientific manufacturing on the medical campus in Erie County.

“With this kind of advanced manufacturing, there’s no reason it can’t be done right here in Erie County,” she said, adding that she wants to increase the amount of federal money in research. “ That will translate into more jobs, more businesses. … We cannot lose the American advantage in research.”

Clinton also said she wants to create more infrastructure jobs and that she plans to push for increased solar and clean energy sources in the U.S.

“Some nation is going to be the 21st-century clean energy superpower — millions of jobs and businesses,” she said. “The way things stand right now, it’ll probably be China, Germany or us. I want it to be us.”

Additionally, Clinton spoke on the importance of closing the wage gap for women, growing the economy, supporting small businesses and securing better wages overall for Americans.

“We’re going to grow the economy, and we’re going to make it fairer, and one of the ways to do both is guarantee that women get equal pay,” she said. “It’s a family issue if you have a mother, a wife, a daughter, a sister.”

Clinton also touched on the need for universal early childhood education and her college tuition plan, which she said would directly affect middle class families.

“I have a plan to give you debt-free tuition at any public college or university,” she said. “I want this to be aimed at middle class families. … We can manage debt-free. You won’t have to borrow anything. I do want students to work 10 hours a week, because that helps keep the costs down.”

In the same vein, Clinton expressed a desire to fix the student-loan debt problem in the country.

“I want to ensure that we tackle the student debt problem at the same time,” she said, adding that student loan borrowers should be able to refinance their debt the same as homeowners and car owners can refinance their mortgages and car payments.

“Then we’re going to have programs where you can move your refinanced debt into paying it back as a percentage of your income instead of a fixed amount with a big interest rate on top, and we’re going to have a deadline. If you pay what you’re supposed to pay every month, at the end of 20 years, you’re done.”

Clinton then shifted her focus to the nation’s health care, saying that under her presidency, she would like to improve upon the Affordable Care Act instead of starting over with a new system. Clinton said she would also work on lowering the cost of prescription drugs, and fight to have both mental health and addiction be viewed and treated as true health issues.

“If we can get everybody in America affordable, quality health care, then we will have achieved a great goal,” she said. “I also want to make sure that we treat mental health like health. … And let’s start treating addiction, either alcohol or drug addiction, as the health problem it is.”

Clinton rounded out Friday’s rally by saying she’d push for unity and bipartisanship in the White House should she be elected president.

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