Weekly Feature

2017-09-07 / Editorial

Out of the Past


STAR PUPILS — A second-grade Colfax Heights classroom is packed full of students, with some sharing a desk. Colfax Heights, a wooden building on West Drullard Avenue, served as a school from 1896 to 1952. Due to an influx of students, the building had been enlarged by 1928 to include four additional classrooms off the rear of the original building. Colfax Heights was later turned into apartments before being torn down in 1962. It was replaced by Central Avenue School in 1951. 
Photo from “Lancaster Memories: A Pictorial History” and courtesy of Mary Jo Monnin and Dick Young STAR PUPILS — A second-grade Colfax Heights classroom is packed full of students, with some sharing a desk. Colfax Heights, a wooden building on West Drullard Avenue, served as a school from 1896 to 1952. Due to an influx of students, the building had been enlarged by 1928 to include four additional classrooms off the rear of the original building. Colfax Heights was later turned into apartments before being torn down in 1962. It was replaced by Central Avenue School in 1951. Photo from “Lancaster Memories: A Pictorial History” and courtesy of Mary Jo Monnin and Dick Young 125 Years Ago

Sept. 8, 1892

• In view of possible visitation of the dread cholera, every householder should see that cellars and the vicinity of their houses are placed in absolute cleanliness. Over-ripe or under-ripe fruit and vegetables should be strictly avoided. The taking of stimulants should be abandoned, and water should be boiled before using. Personal cleanliness is absolutely necessary, if one wishes to escape the scourge.

• The Board of Health of the village of Lancaster met last Saturday for the purpose of making inspection of certain premises in the village, and found a great many places in deplorable sanitary condition.

• The fall term of our school will open Monday, Sept. 12. It is desirable that all those who expect to enter for the fall term be present the first week. Besides the regular graded course of instruction, which corresponds to that of the city schools, other branches, which may seem best suited to the needs of the pupils, will be taught, if a sufficient number present themselves to organize such classes. All those who have completed the work of the first grade and others who wish to take more advanced work, are requested to be present the first day. A special invitation is extended to non-residents capable of doing the work of the more advanced grades.

• The heavy machinery for the new locomotive works of the New York Central at Depew is already beginning to arrive.

Return to top