Weekly Feature



2017-11-09 / Editorial

Out of the Past


WALK THE PLANK — In a photo dated March 8, 1898, Fannie Hummell, left, Anna Mook, Ruth Denny and Winnie Mauer walk along a wooden plank sidewalk on Church Street in Lancaster. Plank sidewalks were laid in the village between 1849 and 1850, consisting of four hemlock planks, each of which were 12 inches wide by 2 inches thick. The sidewalks started to rot after seven years, often needing care and replacement. People served as sidewalk commissioners, each assigned a stretch of road or sidewalk that the homeowner would repair and shovel during winter. 
Photo from “Lancaster Memories: A Pictorial History” and courtesy of Mary Jo Monnin and Dick Young WALK THE PLANK — In a photo dated March 8, 1898, Fannie Hummell, left, Anna Mook, Ruth Denny and Winnie Mauer walk along a wooden plank sidewalk on Church Street in Lancaster. Plank sidewalks were laid in the village between 1849 and 1850, consisting of four hemlock planks, each of which were 12 inches wide by 2 inches thick. The sidewalks started to rot after seven years, often needing care and replacement. People served as sidewalk commissioners, each assigned a stretch of road or sidewalk that the homeowner would repair and shovel during winter. Photo from “Lancaster Memories: A Pictorial History” and courtesy of Mary Jo Monnin and Dick Young 125 Years Ago
Nov. 10, 1892

• With the closing of the polls last night, one of the most interesting elections ever known in this country passed into history, and as a result the Democratic candidates for president and vice president were undoubtedly elected by the voters.

• The road bed for the electric road is being laid on Church Street. It is to run down the middle of the street, which will make it very inconvenient for teams, as the street is narrow.

• A new method of counting the words in a telegram went into effect on the Western Union and Postal Telegraph lines Oct. 1. Under the new rules telegrams will be much cheaper. Single letters, figures and signs, instead of being counted as a word, will be grouped, three taken as a word.

• Tuesday (election) night was unusually dark and windy. Messrs. Charles H. Buills and Phil. N. Eaton, who had been deputed by our election authorities to go to Bowmansville to learn the result of that district for the purpose of completing Lancaster’s election returns, started out in a covered wagon belonging to Mr. George Huber, about 7 p.m., for that place. When about a mile and a half north of this village, where the old bridge has been taken down and a new culvert is being built, not finding anything to warn them that this was the case, they drove directly over the wall of the culvert, the horse and carriage going down at least 6 or 7 feet into the water below. Neither of the young men were badly injured, although they received considerable of a shaking up.

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