Weekly Feature



2018-02-08 / Front Page

Lancaster welcomes two new lieutenants, officer

by AMY ROBB Editor


Michael Drewniak, left, Shaun DiMino and Adam Szwartz were recognized for their new positions within the Lancaster Police Department at Monday night’s Town Board meeting. Drewniak and DiMino take on the roles of lieutenant, and Szwartz becomes the newest officer. 
Photo by Amy Robb Michael Drewniak, left, Shaun DiMino and Adam Szwartz were recognized for their new positions within the Lancaster Police Department at Monday night’s Town Board meeting. Drewniak and DiMino take on the roles of lieutenant, and Szwartz becomes the newest officer. Photo by Amy Robb The Lancaster Town Board on Monday welcomed the friends and family of Shaun DiMino, Michael Drewniak and Adam Szwartz as they accepted positions of lieutenants and officer, respectively.

“Chief [Gerald Gill Jr.] and his captains take a considerable amount of time to go through all the candidates out there in making the decision, and when they do they make the right decision,” said Supervisor Johanna Coleman.

“The entire department is top-notch. It has been my pleasure sitting here as a board member, to have heard just last year two instances where officer DiMino saved lives, and it is my pleasure to vote yes,” added Councilwoman Dawn Gaczewski, referring to DiMino’s role in rescuing a Mayville man from a burning residence in November and assisting with an apartment building fire on Broadway and Church Street just one month before.

Szwartz is a transfer from Lockport and looks forward to serving the community in which he spent much of his youth.

“It will be good to come back to a community that I grew up in and make a difference there,” said Szwartz. “I grew up in Alden, but all the sports were out here, baseball and hockey.”

The board also approved a negative SEQRA declaration for The Rock Child Care Center, which Darlene Bartlett, who currently owns Children’s Kastle, is planning on having built next to the Walden Avenue day care.

The declaration means the proposed 21,550-square-foot, single-story building wouldn’t have a significant impact on the surrounding environment, bringing Bartlett one step closer to building her child care center, which she hopes will provide a safe space for school-age children to socialize and learn.

The board heard comments from the public regarding the project at a public hearing on July 17.

In another matter, restoration work at the Lancaster Historical Society could start as soon as this spring, thanks to a grant awarded through the state Dormitory Authority.

A resolution approved at Monday night’s meeting invites public bids for the society’s Exterior Restoration Project at 40 Clark St. Minority and women-owned businesses are encouraged to submit responses to the bid, according to the resolution.

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