Weekly Feature



2018-06-07 / Editorial

Out of the Past


GLASS WORKS — Lancaster Glass Works operated from 1849 to 1904 as one of the leading industries in the village. Working conditions in factories like this were not pleasant, with ovens operating 24 hours a day, seven days per week. Manufacturing glass in the summer was impossible, making Western New York’s winters essential to the industry. The Lancaster location made glass bottles, bitters bottles and whimseys, according to a plaque dedicated to where the factory once stood at the corner of Lake Avenue and James Street. 
Photos from “Lancaster Memories: A Pictorial History”and courtesy of Mary Jo Monnin and Dick Young. GLASS WORKS — Lancaster Glass Works operated from 1849 to 1904 as one of the leading industries in the village. Working conditions in factories like this were not pleasant, with ovens operating 24 hours a day, seven days per week. Manufacturing glass in the summer was impossible, making Western New York’s winters essential to the industry. The Lancaster location made glass bottles, bitters bottles and whimseys, according to a plaque dedicated to where the factory once stood at the corner of Lake Avenue and James Street. Photos from “Lancaster Memories: A Pictorial History”and courtesy of Mary Jo Monnin and Dick Young. 125 Years Ago
June 8, 1893

• Mr. Fred Grampp, who has been suffering with rheumatism for the past six weeks, is able to be out again.

• Governor Flower has signed the bill making vocal music a part of the course of study in all the public schools of the state. It carries no appropriation.

• Since last Friday night, the trolley cars have not been running on Church Street. They have been compelled to stop at the other side of the Como bridge, owing to a portion of the roadbed having been washed away by the high water.

• By this time, everybody concerned knows that the Buffalo, Bellevue and Lancaster Railway Company had obtained the consent of the majority of the owners of property to lay their tracks on East Main Street and Central Avenue; that in consequence the trustees of the village had given said company a grant which provides for the paving of not less than 9 feet of the portion of the street used by them. Last Saturday afternoon Messrs. Box, Roberts and Littell of the above-mentioned company appeared before the board of trustees and asked for a modification of said grant, which means the grant with the clause providing for paving is left out. This the owners said nothing about, for they all have confidence in our trustees, and believe they will act for the best interests of the village. This, if done, will be in direct violation of the expressed wishes of the people concerned.

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